Human Rights Litigation Promoting International Law in U.S. Courts

Human Rights Litigation Promoting International Law in U.S. Courts
Ying-Jen Lo
September 2005

ISBN-13:  978-1-59332-069-0 / Hardcover
Dimensions:  5.5 x 8.5 / xiv, 348 pages

Price   $80.00

Description

Lo studies how human rights organizations and individual activists have sought to influence American courts on death penalty law and refugee policies. In doing so, she studies whether neutral legal rules have affected judges' decision-making. She concludes that judicial attitude matters most in litigation since judges enjoy autonomous authority in adjudicating cases. Twin goals should dominate human rights activists' agenda: to socialize U.S. judges to international human rights law through tools such as case briefs, amicus statements, and seminars and to extend this socialization to the executive and legislative departments, which, directly or indirectly, influence the courts.

About the Author

Ying-Jen Lo earned a bachelor of law degree from National Chung Hsing University, Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C., a master of law degree from Meiji University, Tokyo, Japan, and a Ph.D. from the Department of Political Science at University of Cincinnati.