Lethal Violence and Religion: Institutional and Denominational Effects on Homicide and Suicides in U.S. Counties

Lethal Violence and Religion: Institutional and Denominational Effects on Homicide and Suicides in U.S. Counties
Bryan K. Robinson
March 2015

ISBN-13:  978-1-59332-769-9 / Hardcover
Dimensions:  5.5 x 8.5 / x, 160 pages

Price   $69.00

Description

Robinson uses sociological principles to examine the impact of community religiosity on county lethal violence rates. Testing both an integrated model and disaggregated models of lethal violence he finds evidence that religious homogeneity is a better predictor of lethal violence than either the rates of religious participation or the prevalence of religious institutions within a county. Moreover, he finds evidence that the presence of different conservative Christian denominations impact community violence in different ways. Specifically, the prevalence of Pentecostal, fundamentalist and evangelical Protestants in counties have different effects on suicide and homicide rates and should be examined independently.

About the Author

Bryan K. Robinson is an Assistant Professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice at the University of Mount Union. Dr. Robinson received his PhD in Sociology from the State University of New York at Albany and both a MA in sociology and a BA in Philosophy from Auburn University. His research and teaching interest include theoretical criminology, violence, and social institutions.