Mental Health among Taiwanese Americans: Gender, Immigration, and Transnational Struggles

Mental Health among Taiwanese Americans: Gender, Immigration, and Transnational Struggles
Chien-Juh Gu
June 2006

ISBN-13:  978-1-59332-130-7 / Hardcover
Dimensions:  5.5 x 8.5 / xvi, 306 pages

Price   $75.00

"With her rich insights, the author provides...a framework for exploring the complex dimensionality of identity, distress, and health." -- Contemporary Sociology

Description

Gu examines how Taiwanese Americans' immigration background, gender, and relations in the family and workplace affect their mental health. She argues that Taiwanese Americans' experience of distress is not only gendered but also transnational. Men's and women's experiences differ, and transnational culture influences how they interpret their worlds. While work situations frustrate men, family life bothers women. Their identities are multiple and fluid, and they struggle with their American-ness and Chinese-ness in everyday life. Men feel excluded by the majority culture in the workplace because they are "too Chinese." Women, in contrast, wonder if they should follow Chinese or American norms in dealing wit their family.

About the Author

Chien-Juh Gu is a post-doctoral research fellow at the Institute of Sociology, Academia Sinica, in Taipei, Taiwan, and an adjunct assistant professor at the Department of Sociology, National Taiwan University. She earned her Ph.D. in 2004 from the Department of Sociology at Michigan State University. Her research interests include gender and mental health, gender and immigration, sociology of the body, and doctor-patient relationships.