Neighborhood Structure, Crime, and Fear of Crime: A Test of Bursik and Grasmick's Systemic Neighborhood Control Theory

Neighborhood Structure, Crime, and Fear of Crime: A Test of Bursik and Grasmick's Systemic Neighborhood Control Theory
Clete Snell
July 2001

ISBN-13:  978-1-931202-07-7 / Hardcover
Dimensions:  5.5 x 8.5 / viii, 160 pages

Price   $52.00

"a thorough overview of Brusik and Grasmick's theory." -- Criminal Justice Review

Description

Snell shows how weak primary and secondary relationships, weak parochial and public control, and high levels of disorder are directly related to increased crime and fear of crime in unstable, racially heterogeneous neighborhoods.

Snell's findings indicate that minority neighborhoods with high levels of disorder and low levels of neighborhood interaction and trust are likely to have higher crime rates. Poor urban neighborhoods with high levels of disorder and fewer family and friendship networks tend to have high levels of fear of crime. Finally, neighborhood disorder is an important factor in explaining crime rates and fear of crime.

These findings lend partial support to Bursik and GrasmickÕs Systemic Neighborhood Control Theory. Their theory is that neighborhood differences in levels of crime and fear of crime result from variations in the ability of neighborhoods to maintain social control. Neighborhood social control is a function of the quality and density of formal and informal networks.

About the Author

Clete Snell is Assistant Professor in the School of Juvenile Justice at Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, Texas. He earned his Ph.D. in 1999 at Sam Houston State University.